PART 3 Visual Communications Exercise 2 Knitting patterns

 

Knitting mindmap Mind map of knitting associations…

FROM TOP LEFT:

1.Knitting : how to knit and what to knit… – 1800s Victorian Knitting patterns.

2. KNITTING HISTORY 101 at link! “The oldest real knitting (formed on two sticks by pulling loops through loops) we’ve got is ‘Coptic socks’ from Egypt, from around the year 1000 CE. There are quite a few fragments, all of them done in shades of white and indigo, in stockinette. Many of them have Khufic (a decorative Arabic script) blessings knit into them, or symbols to ward off evil, or both.”

3. Historical knitting patterns.

4. Fantastic old photo of woman knitting in stovepipe hat. Wales,1875

5. Swedish Mother and Baby.

6. Frank Meadow Sutcliffe : Two women winding wool.

7. Frank Meadow Sutcliffe: Whitby Fisher folk.

8. Fairisle jumper worn by the Prince of Wales

9. 1548 White silk, hand knitted, Duke of Saxony.

10. “Mary Isabella Grant Knitting a Shawl” by Francis Grant, circa 1850. Note the little bag for holding her yarn.

11. Woman stood knitting.

12. Staff Sgt. John Sorich of the Army Reserves’ 401st Bridge Engineer Co., stationed at Victory Base Camp in Baghdad, knows his way around a knitting needle. To relax from the stresses of deployment, he knit caps, gloves, socks, even a pouch for his M4 rifle. He shared his skills with other soldiers.

All images from various sources including previously uploaded images from pinterest. (Accessed 16/12/15).

I felt that my stereotypes where pretty usual for initial thoughts on knitting, however I am aware that there are so many other exciting projects to be discovered, which I am looking forward to researching perhaps within the Textiles part of this course. It was a joy to come across the last photo of the soldiers knitting; not only making items that would be useful for themselves but also as a pass time and way to relax!

I think sadly there is a stereotypical image of an old grannie sat in a rocking chair knitting baby clothes or socks for her husband. This image is very cliché and does not even touch on the immensity and possibilities of knitting!

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FROM TOP:

The Andy Warhol Bridge Was Yarn-Bombed And The Result Is One Amazing Public Artwork.

Yarn bombing – Brazil.

The ultimate “yarnbombed” house by the knitting group Knitting Site, in London.

I am particularly interested in ‘Yarn Bombing’

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yarn_bombing (Accessed 16/12/15)

yarn_bomb_01

http://content.time.com/time/photogallery/0,29307,2077071_2283023,00.html (Accessed 17/12/15)

The image above has got to be one of the most impacting images I have found whilst researching knitting. The idea of shrouding an army tank (used in war) with a pink knitted blanket (representing love?) is an amazing oxymoron.

http://facts.randomhistory.com/knitting-facts.html (Accessed 17/12/15)

No. 8 Knitting was initially a male only occupation, is particularly interesting!

http://www.craftsy.com/blog/2015/07/unusual-knitting-patterns/ (Accessed 17/12/15)

LadyoftheLake-parasol

Photo via Craftsy member Atalante

1. A knitted parasol

Lace shawls, schmace schmawls. Turning a lace shawl into a parasol ups the ante. This parasol’s designer has a tutorial on her site for building the parasol, but you can of course use the lace as a shawl instead. As portable shade, this is functional and lovely, a combination not always easy to balance.

DemiBraandPanty

Photo via Craftsy member Joan McGowan-Michael

5. Bra and underwear set

If someone had told me that they were going to knit a bra and undies set, I’d have looked at them askance. That was before I saw the gorgeous patterns of Joan McGowan-Michael, who combines her background as a fashion designer with her knowledge of knitwear. A cotton/elastic blend makes just the right yarn for undergarments. Who knew you could knit what goes under the sweater as well?

SammichAmigurumi

Photo via Craftsy member cheezombie

2. A sandwich with eyes

A sentient sandwich with eyes sounds nightmarish, but this amigurumi toy is friggin’ adorable — such is the confusing but charming way of amigurumi. I would advise against eating this knitted sandwich, no matter how tempting.

I love these unusual knitted items found on Craftsy website. They show the diversity of wool and how it can be used, crafted and manipulated into so many different forms.

http://www.darkroastedblend.com/2008/10/strange-knits-and-yarn-monsters.html?m=1 (Accessed 17/12/15)

345634yrty

Images taken from the above site, show just how ‘disturbing’ woollen creations can be. Named on the site as “Crochet Help for Ugly Children”! Oh dear.

http://flavorwire.com/140464/10-artists-who-use-yarn-as-their-medium (Accessed 17/12/15)

I found some amazing works of art by various artists on the above site.

http://www.womansday.com/home/crafts-projects/a2484/extreme-knitting-crochet-art-118438/ (Accessed 17/12/15)

54eafed818d5c_-_07-piano-dentelle

“Piano Dentelle” (“Lace Piano”)

In 2010, Lisbon, Portugal–based artist Joana Vasconcelos displayed this intricate piano cover at the Haunch of Venison Gallery in London. Like many of her crochet works, it’s made out of white cotton yarn and looks like lace, helping to bring delicate beauty to the most unlikely of objects. Photo: courtesy of Joana Vasconcelos

I found this work absolutely beautiful.

http://www.knitty.com/ISSUEspring06/FEAThistory101.html (Accessed 17/12/15)

Interesting history on knitting.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/12/04/vaginal-knitting_n_4386419.html (Accessed17/12/15)

The above video was perhaps the most surprising item I found during my knitting research. I understand what the artist is trying to do and feel sympathetic towards the idea, however it is the idea of it being performance art that I feel uncomfortable with but I guess that is what gives the art work the most impact.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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